DSC_5957.jpg

SPRING & SUMMER 2019 GREYSTONE CLASS SCHEDULE

Important Information

* All students, including Greystone Connect students (Online or Live-Stream), must register at Greystone’s Populi registration page. Greystone Connect students will then be sent a unique code for access to course resources at the Greystone Connect website.

* In keeping with Greystone’s commitment to the priority of residential or on-site study, residential study is required for students who live within a thirty (30) mile radius of the Greystone Learning Community location where a residential course is taught. Students requesting an exemption from this on-site policy may write to Greystone’s Administrator (info@greystoneinstitute.org) to explain their special circumstances. A small online/distance technology fee is charged to Greystone Connect students but is waived for residential students.

* The registration deadline for Spring 2018 courses is January 9 at 5 pm (EST). For Summer courses and all one-week intensive courses, the registration deadline is four weeks before the first class meeting. After the registration deadline, a late fee of $75 will be added to the registration fee. After the official start date for the class, registration is allowed only by special permission (contact the Administrator at info@greystoneinstitute.org).

* Note that, except for Live-Stream classes, all Greystone Connect (online) classes include three (3) required video-conference sessions with the instructor (or someone approved by the instructor). The dates for these three (3) sessions will be determined by the instructor after the course student list is finalized.

* Students in Greystone partner degree programs who intend for their Greystone class to count for credit in their “home” institution’s degree program must identify themselves accordingly when registering for a Greystone class. Auditors are welcome in any class and register online.

* As with any Greystone class, Greystone reserves the right to cancel any of the following classes in the event of insufficient full (i.e., not auditor) student registrations.

Please contact Greystone with any questions regarding the schedule, registration, or any other matters.

 

2019 CLASS LIST & SCHEDULE

SPRING 2019 (term period: Feb. 4 to May 6)

Early Modern Natural Philosophy and Theology (Dr. Jason M. Rampelt) | REGISTER (COURSE PREVIEW AT GREYSTOne connect)

Course Codes: CT750P (ThM)/CT950P (PhD): Coraopolis/Pittsburgh | CT750D (ThM)/CT950D (PhD): Greystone Connect (Live-Stream)

Dates/Time: Feb. 4 to May 6 (papers due on May 17) | Wednesdays, 9-11:30 am, EST (GMT +05:00)

Location(s): Greystone Coraopolis/Pittsburgh | Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Format: Seminar

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: For the early modern period (c. 1540–1700), historians of science have often concerned themselves with the ‘Scientific Revolution’, that period in which the study of the natural world took on new forms characterized by empirical methods and material, mechanical, and mathematical modes of description. It was also the time of the Protestant Reformation, and many of the scholars studying natural philosophy were Christian scholars, even if they were not necessarily engaged in the theological issues of their time. Scholarly work in the last two decades has begun to focus more closely on the theological dimension of this period.

Students will read and discuss major works on canonical figures in the Scientific Revolution who also had a significant theological dimension to their work, such as Johannes Kepler, Robert Boyle, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Isaac Newton, Galileo, as well as key intellectual groups such as the Cartesians, the Copernicans, and the Jesuits. Students in this seminar will present on secondary sources and pursue a research project on one or more primary texts from this period.

On the first day of class, all participants will choose two books from a set list covering key figures or themes in the course. For one they will present on a scheduled week, producing a written outline for the seminar group and lead discussion; for the other, they will act as respondent to another student’s presentation (on a different week). Students not presenting on a given week will be assigned a shorter selection from the selected text (e.g. one chapter) in order to prepare for group discussion led by the presenter. In the first weeks the instructor will begin with introductory lectures relevant to the subject and period.

This course will be run as a graduate seminar. Weekly meetings will be held in Coraopolis, PA, USA with connections via Zoom video conference for students who are not local. Draft syllabus and bibliography are available for preview on Greystone Connect. While not a prerequisite, students are strongly encouraged to take or audit the course, 'History of Christianity and Science' prior to this one (offered Fall 2018 and available at Greystone Connect).

 

Theological Anthropology (Dr. Mark A. Garcia) | REGISTER

Course Codes: CD754D (ThM)/CD954D (PhD): Greystone Connect (Online) incl. Three (3) Live Seminars

Dates: Feb. 4 to May 6 (papers due on May 17)

Location(s): Greystone Connect (Online) incl. Three (3) Live Seminars

Format: Taught

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: This advanced course moves beyond survey courses in the theology of human personhood to explore selectively and more thoroughly certain classic and contemporary questions in their historical, theological, ethical, and ecclesiastical contexts. What is a human being? How should we think of materiality? Of the ‘intermediate state’? What is the theological and ethical significance of humanity as ‘male and female’? Are we more than our brains? What is the relationship of ontology and eschatology in how we think of gender, marriage, and human relations? Is there an eschatology of and for gender? What is the image of God, and how do we recognize its restoration by the Spirit? Are we communal creatures? Are we free agents? What is emotion? What are the implications of theological anthropology for relationships, society, and pastoral care?

 

Topics in Soteriology (Dr. Benjamin Burkholder) | REGISTER

Course Codes: CD770P (ThM)/CD970P (PhD): Greystone Coraopolis/Pittsburgh | CD770D (ThM)/CD970D (PhD): Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Dates/Time: Feb. 8 to May 13 (papers due on May 17) | Fridays, 8:30 am to Noon, EST (GMT +05:00)

Location(s): Greystone Coraopolis/Pittsburgh | Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Format: Taught

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: While the ecumenical councils have clarified who the Savior is, namely, that he is both fully divine and fully human, the ecumenical councils never clarified how Christ saves humanity.  The Scriptures have much to say and we will explore how the Scriptures suggest we should answer the question.

However, we do not read the Scriptures in a vacuum. We stand at the end of a history of interpretation.  How have the Christians who have gone before us read these texts and understood how Christ saves humanity? This course will investigate the three primary trajectories that have been taken up in the Christian tradition and discuss their value and ability to capture the biblical insights discussed. In this investigation, there will be particular attention paid to the Reformed approach to soteriological questions along with the challenges that have been raised in response.

Furthermore, recent decades have raised new and pressing concerns in soteriology, asking how we are to understand God’s relationship with violence and whether certain soteriologies lead to behaviors that are antithetical to the Gospel. Feminist, womanist, Anabaptist authors and others have raised concerns that soteriologies that require Jesus’ death foster violence and passivity in the face of evil and are therefore deleterious. How should these concerns shape soteriology, if at all? Or, if one holds to a Reformed Confessional view, what kind of response should be forthcoming? 

 

Job as Christian Scripture (Dr. Don Collett) | REGISTER

Course Codes: HS 721D (ThM)/921D (PhD): Greystone Connect (Online) incl. Three (3) Live Seminars

Dates: Feb. 4 to May 6 (papers due on May 17)

Location(s): Greystone Connect (Online) incl. Three (3) Live Seminars

Format: Taught

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: Can God be trusted in the midst of our suffering?  Although the book of Job offers its own response to this question, many in our day remain deeply dissatisfied with that response.  While the reasons for this dissatisfaction are many, they are often linked to the assumption that the book was written to answer the question “why do the righteous suffer?” In its confrontation and engagement with the mystery of suffering in Job’s life, the book does not provide an answer to this question, but instead encourages its readers to find rest in the wisdom of God in the midst of suffering by raising the question “where shall wisdom be found?”

This course seeks to introduce students to a ruled reading of the book of Job in light of its theological context, literary structure, and verbal profile.   A critical discussion of the history of Job’s interpretation, both premodern (Gregory, Maimonides, Aquinas, Calvin) and modern (Kafka, Jung), will also form an essential part of the course.  Various exegetical and historical issues raised by the book will be discussed, not merely for their own sake, but specifically with a view toward promoting a deeper understanding of the character of Job as Christian scripture.  To that end, the book’s outlook on a number of theological and literary issues will be canvassed, for example, the contribution made by wisdom, providence and figuration for assessing Job’s message, as well as the literary and theological significance of conflict and reversal.

 

Reformed Catholicity (Dr. Mark A. Garcia) | REGISTER

Course Codes: CD750D (ThM)/CT950D (PhD): Greystone Connect (Online) incl. Three (3) Live Seminars

Dates: Feb. 4 to May 6 (papers due on May 17)

Location(s): Greystone Connect (Online) incl. Three (3) Live Seminars

Format: Taught

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: What is the center, and what are the outer limits, of the Christian Faith? How does the confessional Reformed tradition relate to the Christian tradition as a whole? How does the ontology of Scripture as the Church's divinely inspired canon affect the work of theology? Does the story of Scripture's formation illuminate the relationship of Scripture to tradition and confession? These and other questions are explored in this core class in the Greystone program. “Catholicity” is an often-misunderstood term, and “Reformed Catholicity” sounds to others like a contradiction, but in fact the early and formative voices of Reformed Protestantism were persuaded the life and health of the Church depends on its catholicity in Protestant, not Roman Catholic terms.

In recent decades, developments in the “theological interpretation of Scripture,” “canonical hermeneutics/theology,” and advanced research into the texts and figures of post-Reformation Reformed theologians and confessions have returned the question of Reformed catholicity to the attention of the Church. New efforts include a considered zeal:

  • to retrieve the best of the patristic and medieval traditions on which the Reformation depended;

  • to reconsider the Reformed catholic efforts of bodies such as the Regensburg Colloquy and Westminster Assembly as well as figures such as Martin Bucer, William Perkins, John Williamson Nevin, and Herman Bavinck;

  • and to renew the Church's practical commitment to the Bible as Holy Scripture rather than mere historical artifact or source material.

Advances in responsible models and commendations of catholicity in theology are plentiful and varied, and some of the most promising ideas proceed not only from scholarly voices across the disciplines in our own day but also through distinctive 20th century Reformed contributions on the unity of theology, on canon and Christology, on Scripture and tradition, and on recovering the distinctly Christian “theo-logical” nature of theology. These and other shifts in scholarship—especially work on canon, the rule of faith, the nature of history, and pneumatology—place us in an enviable position of great opportunity. This class argues for the nature and the importance of Reformed catholicity, and charts the way forward for further development.

 

SUMMER 2019

Richard Hooker Among the Theologians: Introduction to The English Reformation (Dr. W. Bradford Littlejohn) | REGISTER

CT748P (ThM)/CT948P (PhD): Greystone Coraopolis/Pittsburgh | CT748D (ThM)/CT948D (PhD):  Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Dates/Time: May 13-17, 2019 | 8:30 am – 3:30 pm EST (GMT +05:00) (Friday session concludes at Noon)

Location(s): Greystone Coraopolis | Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Format: Taught

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: This course will provide an overview of the theology and history of the early English Reformed (or "Anglican," as it later came to be called) Church, with an emphasis on the thought of its greatest advocate, Richard Hooker. Through careful reading of primary and secondary texts, the lectures and seminar discussion will investigate the early English Reformation and the rise of Reformed Anglicanism, the emergence of the Puritan movement, Hooker’s complicated response to Puritanism, Hooker’s theology, and the Jacobean Church.

 

The Theological Virtues: Faith, Hope, and Love (Dr. Mark A. Garcia) | REGISTER

Course Codes: CD768P (ThM)/CD768P (PhD) | CD768D (ThM)/CD968D (PhD):  Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Dates/Time: May 27-31 | 8:30 am – 3:30 pm EST (GMT +05:00) (Friday session concludes at Noon)

Location(s): Greystone Coraopolis | Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Format: Taught

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: This course explores the wide range of historical, biblical, theological-ethical, and pastoral concerns brought into view by the so-called “theological virtues.” Topics include the theological exegesis of the places in Scripture where the virtues triad is thought to occur, including the question of its origins; the virtues in the work of Augustine, Aquinas, Lombard, modern theology, and in contemporary virtue theorists and ethicists such as Stanley Hauerwas, Alisdaire MacIntyre, and Oliver O’Donovan; the relationship between the theological virtues and the problem of evil and suffering in Reformed theology; death and waiting; and the forms the theological virtues take in Church and Christian life.

 

Topics in the Holy Spirit (Dr. Lane Tipton) | REGISTER

Course Codes: CD771L (ThM)/CD971L (PhD): Greystone London | CD771D (ThM)/CD971D (PhD):  Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Dates/Time: June 24-28, 2019 | 9 am – 3:30 pm BST (2-8:30 pm EST) (Friday session concludes at Noon)

Location(s): Greystone London [@ The Pastors’ Academy] | Greystone Connect (Live-Stream Only)

Format: Taught

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: This course is designed to deepen understanding of the work of the Holy Spirit in covenant theology. It will consist of a series of close reads of biblical texts that focus on the integration of image of God and covenant, with an emphasis on the Holy Spirit and eschatology. Special attention will be given from an exegetical perspective to the redemptive-historical character and systematic theological implications for developing a reformed theology of the Holy Spirit. The lectures will seek to build on a short but focused required reading list.

 

Christianity in Late Antiquity (Dr. Mark W. Graham) | REGISTER

CD733P (ThM)/CD933P (PhD): Greystone Coraopolis/Pittsburgh | CD733D (ThM)/CD933D (PhD):  Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Dates/Time: June 24-28, 2019 | 8:30 am – 3:30 pm EST (GMT +05:00) (Friday session concludes at Noon)

Location(s): Greystone Coraopolis | Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Format: Taught

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: The rise of Christianity stands as arguably the most far-reaching social, cultural, political, intellectual, and spiritual shift in human history.  During the period known as Late Antiquity, between the third and seventh centuries, the Christian movement was grounded in fundamental ways – most of the major Church Fathers lived, wrote, and taught during this era; six of the seven ecumenical councils met to affirm basics of Christian orthodoxy; and a variety of Christian practices, such as asceticism and pilgrimage, arose which continue to shape various branches of Christianity today.  At the same time, the movement was growing exponentially in numbers and reach, spreading out from its Mediterranean and Near Eastern home to stretch from the British isles to China and from northern Europe to Nubia and Yemen.  During this era, the “One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic Church” worshipped in languages and cultural expressions ranging from Latin and Greek to Syriac, Armenian, Axumite, Arabic, and even Mandarin Chinese.  This course explores the backdrop as well as key figures, major historical moments, and central teachings and practices of Christianity during this watershed period of history.

 

Peter Lombard’s Sentences: Theological Engagement with the Christian Tradition (Dr. Atria A. Larson) | REGISTER

Course Codes: CT737D (ThM)/CD937D (PhD):  Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Dates: Summer

Location(s): Greystone Coraopolis | Greystone Connect (Live-Stream only)

Format: Seminar/Guided Reading/Independent Study

Course Credit Hours: 3 (N.B. 3 credit hours is the standard full/maximum credit per course in the US college and university system)

Description: Encounter the great texts of the Christian tradition through the most familiar of medieval school guides, the Lombard's famous Sentences. This is a postgraduate guided reading/independent study module on the context, content, and legacy of Peter Lombard's extraordinarily influential Sentences. Includes sustained engagement with the texts of Augustine, Hilary, Ambrose, Gregory, and others through the lens provided by Lombard. This module is structured as follows: one (1) orientation lecture provided online, followed by 12 weeks of readings and 3 scheduled (online video-conference) class-wide seminar discussion times. After the schedule of readings is completed, one research paper is required.

FALL 2018 OFFERINGS

Coraopolis/Pittsburgh and Greystone Connect:

The Theological Virtues: Faith, Hope, Love | Dr Mark A. Garcia | one-week intensive Sept. 24-28

Job: Text, Interpretation, & Theology | Dr Don Collett | Mon-Wed, Oct 15-17 plus Fridays Oct 26 & Nov 9

 

Greystone Connect, including three video-conference meetings within semester:

Lombard's Sentences | Dr Atria Larson | semester

Theological Anthropology | Dr Mark A Garcia | semester

History of Christianity and Science | Dr Jason M Rampelt | semester

Reformed Catholicity | Dr Mark A Garcia | Greystone Connect | semester


Spring 2019

Coraopolis/Pittsburgh and Greystone Connect:

Topics in Soteriology | Dr Benjamin Burkholder | Fridays, 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM (EST)

Early Modern Natural Philosophy and Theology | Dr Jason M Rampelt | Wednesdays, 9:00-11:30 AM (EST)

 

June/July 2019

Coraopolis/Pittsburgh and Greystone Connect:

Christianity in Late Antiquity | Dr Mark Graham | one-week intensive, specific dates TBD

JOB by Dr Don Collett

Coraopolis/Pittsburgh, PA & Live-stream via Greystone Connect

Mon-Wed, 8:30 am to 4 pm, Oct 15-17 | Fridays, 6-9 pm, Oct 26 & Nov 9